Sani Maya

Posted by: Administrator

246. Sani Maya
Photo By: Sangharsha Bhattarai
Post Date: July 31, 2008
Description: Sani Maya studies in grade 3, in a local high-school in Darshing Pauwa (8kms walk from Nagarkot). She is a bit shy but loves to talk when she is with her friends.

Camera : Canon EOS 400D.
Photo details: Aperture: F/6.3; ISO:100, Focal Length:55mm, Shutter Speed: 1/250sec

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Sani Maya was last modified: July 31st, 2008 by Administrator

Blog Comments

  1. Sangharsha

    Thanks for the comments, gTox, Pragya, Suresh & Dreamsky.
    Thanks Shutterbug for the detailed feedback on portrait photography. While convincing her to pose in spite of her reluctance, i tried to make it as obvious a shot as possible…
    I’ll keep the details in my mind in upcoming days.

  2. Shutterbug

    It’s a so-so portrait of a village girl and obvious ‘rule of thirds’ makes its composition all good. Giving some space toward the direction where the subject ‘Person’ is looking at always gives good sense to the picture. However, Sangharsha should have used fill-in flash (force flash if camera is in auto mood) to eliminate harsh shadows around her eyes and under her chin. Shadows make Sani Maya looks even more weak and sad.

    Sometime photographer needs to walk ‘an extra mile’ to capture WOW portraits. And there are some rules I follow when photographing people in their local context. Keep in mind the principles of treating people with respect. If you are not taking candid shot, never point your camera toward the person impolitely if s/he is aware of your presence.

    Always focus on eyes, (eyes should be sharp, no matter what). Try to click it in a natural way (un-posed) while your subject is doing something from their normal daily life.

    Choose your Background carefully to make your picture contextual. Exclude elements that is too distracting and don’t support the story of your subject.

    Fill one third of frame by your subject. Some of the best shots I’ve taken of people while traveling have been where I’ve tightly frames people’s faces. Remember: if your pictures are not good enough, you are not close enough. Use a good zoom lens.

    Nepal has a variety of ethnic groups and communities. And good portraits can beautifully represent these various culture and costume more effective.

    Try candid photography. These shots often include people interacting with others or expressing true emotion.

    To make flattering portraits you also need to understand nature of your lens lens. I’m a big believer in that virtually any lens can take a good portrait shot if you work to its strengths. Having said that, some lenses do tend to lend themselves to great portraits. I find that a focal length between 50mm and 135mm is a good range to work with. Though wide angle lenses do distort your subject’s face, it sometime creates very effective portraits. And yes having a longer focal length is useful to put your subjects at ease.

  3. DreamSky

    Nice portrait. Her green cloth blending in to the background adds up to the compostition.

    (Good to see all these beautiful pictures here in LIN :smile: )

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